Dark Pattern

In graphic and web design, a dark pattern is "a user interface that has been carefully crafted to trick users into doing things, such as buying insurance with their purchase or signing up for recurring bills."[1][2][3] The neologism dark pattern was coined by Harry Brignull in August 2010 with the registration of darkpatterns.org, a "pattern library with the specific goal of naming and shaming deceptive user interfaces."[4][5]

Forms

Bait-and-switch

Bait-and-switch patterns advertise a free (or greatly reduced) product or service which is wholly unavailable or stocked in small quantities. After it is apparent the product is no longer available, they are exposed to other priced products similar to the one advertised.[6][7]

Forced disclosure

A forced disclosure pattern offer low-cost or free services, but require that the user divulge sensitive information such as credit card information, personal addresses, and phone numbers. Some companies will then sell this information to advertisers.[6][7]

Roach motel

A roach motel or a trammel net[8] is a situation that is easy or straightforward to get into, but difficult to get out of. Examples include businesses that require subscribers to print and mail their opt-out or cancellation request.[6][7]

References

  1. ^ Campbell-Dollaghan, Kelsey (21 Dec 2016). "The Year Dark Patterns Won". CO.DESIGN. Retrieved 2017. 
  2. ^ Singer, Natasha (14 May 2016). "When Websites Won't Take No For An Answer". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017. 
  3. ^ Nield, David (4 April 2017). "Dark Patterns: The Ways Websites Trick Us Into Giving Up Our Privacy". Gizmodo. Retrieved 2017. 
  4. ^ Brignull, Harry (1 Nov 2011). "Dark Patterns: Deception vs. Honesty in UI Design". A List Apart. Retrieved 2017. 
  5. ^ Grauer, Yael (28 July 2016). "Dark Patterns Are Designed to Trick You, and They're All Over the Web". Ars Technica. Retrieved 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c Snyder, Jesse (10 Sep 2012). "Dark Patterns in UI and Website Design". evatotuts+. Retrieved 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c Brignull, Harry. "Types of Dark Patterns". Dark Patterns. Retrieved 2017. 
  8. ^ Brignull, Harry (29 August 2013). "Dark patterns: Inside the interfaces designed to trick you". The Verge. Retrieved 2017. 

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.


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