Document File Format

A document file format is a text or binary file format for storing documents on a storage media, especially for use by computers. There currently exists a multitude of incompatible document file formats.

A rough consensus has been established that XML is to be the technical basis for future document file formats,[who?] although PDF is likely to remain the format of choice for fixed-layout documents. Examples of XML-based open standards are DocBook, XHTML, and, more recently, the ISO/IEC standards OpenDocument (ISO 26300:2006) and Office Open XML (ISO 29500:2008).

In 1993, the ITU-T tried to establish a standard for document file formats, known as the Open Document Architecture (ODA) which was supposed to replace all competing document file formats. It is described in ITU-T documents T.411 through T.421, which are equivalent to ISO 8613. It did not succeed.

Page description languages such as PostScript and PDF have become the de facto standard for documents that a typical user should only be able to create and read, not edit. In 2001, a series of ISO/IEC standards for PDF began to be published, including the specification for PDF itself, ISO-32000.

HTML is the most used and open international standard and it is also used as document file format. It has also become ISO/IEC standard (ISO 15445:2000).

The default binary file format used by Microsoft Word (.doc) has become widespread de facto standard for office documents, but it is a proprietary format and is not always fully supported by other word processors.<script async src="//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js"></script> <script>

 (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({
   google_ad_client: "ca-pub-1164194114021965",
   enable_page_level_ads: true
 });

</script>

Common document file formats

See also

References

  1. ^ "Microsoft Office Binary (doc, xls, ppt) File Formats". 2008-02-15. Archived from the original on 2009-03-08. Retrieved .
  2. ^ Microsoft Corporation (2010-07-23). "MS-DOC - Word Binary File Format (.doc) Structure Specification". Retrieved .
  3. ^ "What is DjVu - DjVu.org". DjVu.org. Retrieved .
  4. ^ Microsoft Corporation (May 1999). "Rich Text Format (RTF) Specification, version 1.6". Retrieved .
  5. ^ "4.3 Non-HTML file formats". e-Government Unit. May 2002. Archived from the original on February 18, 2010. Retrieved .
  6. ^ "RTF (.rtf)--Wolfram Language Documentation". reference.wolfram.com.
  7. ^ "WD: Rich Text Format (RTF) Specification 1.7". support.microsoft.com.
  8. ^ "Techtree.com India > Technology News, Reviews of Mobile Phones, PC Hardware and Electronics, Free Downloads, Forums, Helpdesk, Ask Tech Tree". 2013-10-29. Archived from the original on October 29, 2013.
  9. ^ Ranjan Parekh, Ranjan (2006). Principles of Multimedia. Tata McGraw-Hill. p. 87. ISBN 0-07-058833-3.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Document_file_format
 



 

Connect with defaultLogic
What We've Done
Led Digital Marketing Efforts of Top 500 e-Retailers.
Worked with Top Brands at Leading Agencies.
Successfully Managed Over $50 million in Digital Ad Spend.
Developed Strategies and Processes that Enabled Brands to Grow During an Economic Downturn.
Taught Advanced Internet Marketing Strategies at the graduate level.


Manage research, learning and skills at defaultlogic.com. Create an account using LinkedIn to manage and organize your omni-channel knowledge. defaultlogic.com is like a shopping cart for information -- helping you to save, discuss and share.


  Contact Us