Openstack Appliance

An OpenStack Appliance[1] is the name given to software that can support the OpenStack cloud computing platform on either physical devices such as servers or virtual machines or a combination of the two.

Typically a software appliance[2] is a set of software capabilities that can function without an operating system. Thus, they must contain enough of the essential underlying operating system components to work.

Therefore, a strict definition might be: an application that is designed to offer OpenStack capability without the necessity of an underlying operating system.

However, applying this strict definition may not be helpful, as there is not really a clear distinction between an appliance and a distribution.[3] It could be argued that the term appliance is something of a misnomer because OpenStack itself is referred to as a cloud operating system[4] so using the term OpenStack appliance could be a misnomer if one is being pedantic.

If we look at the range of Appliances and Distributions one could make the distinction that distributions are those toolsets which attempt to provide a wide coverage of the OpenStack project scope, whereas an Appliance will have a more narrow focus, concentrating on fewer projects.

Vendors have been heavily involved in OpenStack since its inception, and have since developed and are marketing a wide range of appliances, applications and distributions.

History

OpenStack was established as an initiative of NASA and Rackspace in 2010[5] with the following mission statement,  "to produce the ubiquitous Open Source Cloud Computing platform that will meet the needs of public and private clouds regardless of size, by being simple to implement and massively scalable".[6]

The OpenStack organization has grown rapidly and is supported by more than 540 companies.[7]

In 2012 NASA withdrew from OpenStack as an active contributor, and instead made the strategic decision to use Amazon Web Services for cloud-based services.[8]

The OpenStack challenge

Openstack is a complex entity, and adopters face a range of challenges when trying to implement OpenStack in an organisation. For many organisations trying to implement their own projects, a key issue is the lack of skills available.[9] In an article on The New Stack, Atul JHA succinctly identifies five challenges any organization wishing to deploy OpenStack will face.[10]

Installation challenges

OpenStack is a suite of projects rather than a single product, and because each of the various applications needs to be configured to suit the user's requirements, installation is complex and requires a range of complementary skill-sets[11] for an optimum set-up. One obvious solution would be to take a complete vendor supplied package containing hardware and software, although due diligence is essential.[12]

Documentation

This is more a function of the nature of documentation with open source products than OpenStack per se, but with more than 25 projects, managing document quality is always going to be challenging.[13]

Upgrading OpenStack

One of the main objectives of using cloud type infrastructure is that it offers its users not only high reliability but also high availability,[14] something that public cloud suppliers will offer in Service Level Agreements.[15]

Such is the nature of OpenStack, due to its multi-project development approach, is that the complexity involved in synchronising the different projects during an upgrade implementation may mean that downtime is an unavoidable consequence.[16]

Long term support

It's quite common for a business to keep using an earlier release of software for some time after it has been upgraded. The reasons for this are pretty obvious and referred to above. However, there is little incentive for developers in an open source project to provide support for superseded code. In addition, OpenStack itself has formally discontinued support for some old releases.[17]

Given the above challenges the most appropriate route for an organization wishing to implement OpenStack would be to go with a vendor, and source an OpenStack appliance or distribution.        

Selecting a vendor

A large number of vendors offer OpenStack solutions, meaning that an organization wishing to deploy the technology has a complex task in selecting the vendor offer that best matches its business requirements.[18] Barb Darrow offered this over view in Fortune on May 27 2015,[19] pointing out that there may be some consolidation in the market that will clarify things.

There are other aspects that people need to consider, for example, the real costs involved.[20] How much of the actual OpenStack platform is offered? Some vendors will make an offer which encompasses most of the OpenStack projects; others will only offer certain components. Please refer to the table below for details. Other considerations: to what extent has a vendor injected proprietary code to manage a lack of maturity in an OpenStack component?[21] And to what extent does proprietary code mean vendor lock-in?[22]

The most authoritative information on vendor products is at the OpenStack Foundation website.[23]

OpenStack Appliances and Distros

Supplier
Product Block

Storage

App

Compute

API

Dashboard Database

API

Elastic

Map

Reduce

Identity

API

Image

Service

Network

API

Storage

API

Orchestration

API

Telemetry
Ubuntu Ubuntu

OpenStack

Trunk

Cinder

v2.0

Trunk

Nova

v3o

Trunk

Horizon

Juno

Trove

Juno

Sahara

V1.0

Trunk

Keystone

v3.0

Trunk

Neutron

v2.0

Trunk

Swift

v2.0

Trunk

Heat

v1.0

Trunk

Ceilometer

v2.0

Swiftstack Object

Storage

Platform

Trunk

Swift

V1.0

TransCirrus Cloud

Appliance

Icehouse

Cinder

v2.0

Icehouse

Nova

v2.0

Icehouse

Keystone

v2.0

Icehouse

Glance

v2.0

Icehouse

Neutron

v2.0

Icehouse

Heat

v1.0

Icehouse

Ceilometer

v2.0

Oracle OpenStack

for Oracle

Linux

Icehouse

Cinder

v2.0

Icehouse

Nova

v2.0

Icehouse

Horizon

Icehouse

Keystone

v2.0

Icehouse

Glance

v2.0

Icehouse

Neutron

v2.0

Icehouse

Swift

2.0

EMC Project Caspian Cinder Nova Horizon Glance Neutron Heat
EasyStack ES Cloud 2 Icehouse

Cinder

v2.0

Icehouse

Nova

v2.0

Icehouse

Horizon

Icehouse

Keystone

v2.0

Icehouse

Glance

v2.0

Icehouse

Neutron

v2.0

Icehouse

Swift

2.0

Icehouse

Heat

v1.0

Icehouse

Ceilometer

v2.0

VMWare Integrated

OpenStack

Icehouse

Cinder

v2.0

Icehouse

Nova

v2.0

Icehouse

Horizon

Icehouse

Keystone

v2.0

Icehouse

Glance

v2.0

Icehouse

Neutron

v2.0

Icehouse

Swift

2.0

Icehouse

Heat

v1.0

Red Hat Enterprise

Linux

OpenStack

Platform

Juno

Cinder

v2.0

Juno

Nova

v2.0

Juno

Horizon

Juno

Sahara

v1.0

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Glance

v2.0

Juno

Neutron

v2.0

Juno

Swift

v2.0

Juno

Heat

v1.0

Juno

Ceilometer

v2.0

Bright Computing Bright

OpenStack

Juno

Cinder

v2.0

Juno

Nova

v2.0

Juno

Horizon

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Glance

v2.0

Juno

Neutron

v2.0

Juno

Swift

v2.0

Juno

Heat

v1.0

IBM Cloud

Management

with

OpenStack

Juno

Cinder

v2.0

Juno

Nova

v2.0

Juno

Horizon

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Glance

v2.0

Juno

Neutron

v2.0

Juno

Swift

v2.0

Juno

Heat

v1.0

Juno

Ceilometer

v2.0

Huawei Fushionsphere

OpenStack

Juno

Cinder

v2.0

Juno

Nova

v2.0

Juno

Horizon

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Glance

v2.0

Juno

Neutron

v2.0

Juno

Swift

v2.0

Juno

Heat

v1.0

Juno

Ceilometer

v2.0

Oracle OpenStack for

Solaris

Juno

Cinder

v2.0

Juno

Horizon

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Glance

v2.0

Juno

Neutron

v2.0

Juno

Swift

v2.0

Juno

Heat

v1.0

Piston OpenStack Icehouse

Cinder

v2.0

Icehouse

Nova

v2.0

Icehouse

Horizon

Icehouse

Keystone

v2.0

Icehouse

Glance

v2.0

Icehouse

Neutron

v2.0

Icehouse

Swift

2.0

Cisco OpenStack

Private

Cloud

Icehouse

Cinder

v2.0

Icehouse

Nova

v2.0

Icehouse

Horizon

Icehouse

Keystone

v2.0

Icehouse

Glance

v2.0

Icehouse

Neutron

v2.0

Icehouse

Swift

2.0

Icehouse

Heat

v1.0

SUSE Cloud Icehouse

Cinder

v2.0

Icehouse

Nova

v2.0

Icehouse

Horizon

Icehouse

Keystone

v2.0

Icehouse

Glance

v2.0

Icehouse

Neutron

v2.0

Icehouse

Swift

2.0

Icehouse

Heat

v1.0

Icehouse

Ceilometer

v2.0

IBM Spectrum

Scale for

Object Store

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Swift

v2.0

Rackspace Private Cloud

Software

Juno

Cinder

v2.0

Juno

Nova

v2.0

Juno

Horizon

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Glance

v2.0

Juno

Neutron

v2.0

Juno

Swift

v2.0

Juno

Heat

v1.0

Platform 9 Managed

OpenStack

Juno

Cinder

v2.0

Juno

Nova

v2.0

Juno

Horizon

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Glance

v2.0

Juno

Neutron

v2.0

Juno

Heat

v1.0

CloudScaling Open Cloud

System

Icehouse

Cinder

v2.0

Icehouse

Nova

v2.0

Icehouse

Horizon

Icehouse

Keystone

v2.0

Icehouse

Glance

v2.0

Icehouse

Swift

2.0

Icehouse

Heat

v1.0

Icehouse

Ceilometer

v2.0

Stratoscale Stratoscale Juno

Nova

v2.0

Mirantis Mirantis

OpenStack

Juno

Cinder

v2.0

Juno

Nova

v2.0

Juno

Horizon

Juno

Sahara

v1.0

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Glance

v2.0

Juno

Neutron

v2.0

Juno

Swift

v2.0

Juno

Heat

v1.0

Juno

Ceilometer

v2.0

HP Helion

OpenStack

Juno

Cinder

v2.0

Juno

Nova

v2.0

Juno

Horizon

June

Trove

v1.0

Juno

Sahara

v1.0

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Glance

v2.0

Juno

Neutron

v2.0

Juno

Swift

v2.0

Juno

Heat

v1.0

Juno

Ceilometer

v2.0

Enovance Service

Provider

Cloud

Icehouse

Cinder

v2.0

Icehouse

Nova

v2.0

Icehouse

Horizon

Icehouse

Keystone

v2.0

Icehouse

Glance

v2.0

Icehouse

Neutron

v2.0

Icehouse

Swift

2.0

Icehouse

Heat

v1.0

Icehouse

Ceilometer

v2.0

ONXY Electra

Stack

Icehouse

Cinder

v2.0

Icehouse

Nova

v2.0

Icehouse

Horizon

Icehouse

Keystone

v2.0

Icehouse

Glance

v2.0

Icehouse

Neutron

v2.0

Icehouse

Swift

2.0

Icehouse

Heat

v1.0

Icehouse

Ceilometer

v2.0

Breqwatr Cloud

Appliance

Juno

Cinder

v2.0

Juno

Nova

v2.0

Juno

Keystone

v3.0

Juno

Glance

v2.0

Juno

Heat

v1.0

Juno

Ceilometer

v2.0

        

References

  1. ^ "Openstack Organisation". Openstack.org. Openstack Foundation. Retrieved 2015. 
  2. ^ "Definition of a Software Appliance". pcmag.com. Ziff Davis. Retrieved 2015. 
  3. ^ Datta, Alana (1 September 2009). "A (SUSE) Studio to Edit and Roll Out Your Appliance". OpenSourceForYou. EFYIIndia. Retrieved 2015. 
  4. ^ "OpenStack: The Open Source Cloud Operating System". www.openstack.org. OpenStack Foundation. Retrieved 2015. 
  5. ^ "Introduction a Bit of Openstack History". Docs Openstack. Openstack Foundation. Retrieved 2015. 
  6. ^ "Open Stack Wiki Main Page Mission". 24 May 2010. Openstack Foundation. Retrieved 2015. 
  7. ^ "Openstack Organisation Foundation Companies". Openstack Organisation. Openstack Foundation. Retrieved 2015. 
  8. ^ Babcock, Chris (18 June 2012). "NASA Drops OpenStack For Amazon Cloud". Information Week. UBM Tech. Retrieved 2012. 
  9. ^ Tsidulko, Joseph (6 August 2015). "OpenStack Community Challenged By Dearth Of Talent, Complexity". CRN. The Channel Company. Retrieved 2015. 
  10. ^ Jha, Atul (December 2011). "OpenStack Has Its Issues but it's Worth a Fortune". Thenewstack.io. The New Stack. Retrieved 2015. 
  11. ^ Laube, David (12 January 2015). "Why We Threw 4 Months of Work in the Trash; or How we Failed at OpenStack". Packet.net. Packet. Retrieved 2015. 
  12. ^ SVERDLIK, Yevgeniy (April 1, 2015). "Private OpenStack Startup Nebula Goes Out of Business". Data Center Knowledge. Penton. Retrieved 2015. 
  13. ^ Lester, Andy (10 January 2013). "13 Things People Hate about Your Open Source Docs". Smart Bear. SmartBear Software. Retrieved 2015. 
  14. ^ "Increased Availability and Reliability". WhatIsCloud.com. Arcitura Education Inc. Retrieved 2015. 
  15. ^ Baset, Salman. "Cloud SLAs: Present and Future" (PDF). www.cs.columbia.edu. Retrieved 2015. 
  16. ^ Darrow, Barb (20 December 2013). ""Backbreaking" OpenStack migrations hinder enterprise upgrades". gigaom.com. Knowingly Inc. Retrieved 2015. 
  17. ^ "Releases". wikiOpenStack.otg. Openstack Foundation. Retrieved 2015. 
  18. ^ Allen, Scott (19 May 2015). "5 Questions You Should Ask a Potential OpenStack Vendor". Intel Communities. Intel. Retrieved 2015. 
  19. ^ Darrow, Barb (7 May 2015). "Is there such a thing as too many clouds?". Fortune. Time Inc. Retrieved 2015. 
  20. ^ Finnegan, Matthew (1 May 2015). "OpenStack 'more costly' than VMware and Microsoft for private clouds". Computerworlduk,com. IDG. Retrieved 2015. 
  21. ^ Clark, Jack (13 May 2014). "HP: OpenStack's networking nightmare Neutron 'was everyone's fault". The Register. The Register. Retrieved 2015. 
  22. ^ Donnelly, Caroline (3 March 2015). "HP updates Helion OpenStack in latest hybrid cloud push". Computer Weekly. TechTarget. Retrieved 2015. 
  23. ^ "Distro's and appliances". Openstack.org. Openstack Foundation. 

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.


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