Responsive Web Design with HTML5 and CSS3

Responsive Web Design with HTML5 and CSS3
By Ben Frain

Price: $39.99 Details

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Average customer review:
(91 customer reviews)

Product Description

"Learn responsive design using HTML5 and CSS3 to adapt websites to any browser or screen size."


Product Details

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #673530 in Books
  • Published on: 2012-04-10
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: 9.25" h x .73" w x 7.50" l, 1.23 pounds
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 324 pages

Editorial Reviews

About the Author
Ben Frain has been a freelance front-end web designer/developer for over a decade working directly with clients and alongside design agencies worldwide. He also works as a technology journalist, contributing regularly to a number of diverse publications on the Mac platform, future technology, website design and technology systems. Before that, he worked as an underrated (and modest) TV actor, having graduated from Salford University with a degree in Media and Performance. He has written four equally underrated (his opinion) screenplays and still harbors the (fading) belief he might sell one. Outside of work he enjoys playing indoor football whilst his body (and wife) still allow it. Visit him online at http://www.benfrain.com and follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/benfrain


Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

43 of 44 people found the following review helpful.
2Overpriced and incorrect math
By CH3CH2OH
Honestly, I feel duped by all the 5 star reviews. This book is worth about $10 if you are say, a freelance web developer interested in a feet-wet dip into responsive design. For $35 I expect a reference book and this book falls far short of that. To explain more: In the first 4 chapters, ff you cut out the random opinions by the Author, the repetitive 101 level CSS2 stuff and the screen shots, then you are quite literally left with a couple of examples on media queries. Maybe 3 pages of actual information. It does get a little better after that but there is still a ton of filler.

This book is a gentle, first person written intro into some aspects of responsive design. Most of the story-time sections are plain common sense to any developer, regardless of their level of knowledge in responsive design. For a book on HTML5 there is a major lack of understanding of JavaScript from the author. When he is not recommending against it, he recommends its use in antiquated or inefficient ways, such as using in line event handlers.

Another detraction from the book for me was an unforgivable error that the Author makes:

He encourages the use of % over pixel. He is totally right that for fluid layout that technique works. However he devotes a half page to defending it and even argues that you should not round a 9 digit number (like 43.9919951%) to a more reasonable 4 or 5 digits. That statement shows a total lack of comprehension of basic math, browser interpretation and even screen resolution.

To a screen there is no such thing as 1/2 a pixel. On a device with a 2400 pixel wide screen, the difference between 43.991 and 43.999 is not even 1 pixel. So 5 digits is more than enough. But the author insists that you type the extra 4 digits for utterly no point whatsoever.

Worse, all IE browsers truncate your CSS % to only the first 2 decimal places anyway (Firefox does 3, webkit 15). So in a book devoted to giving a similar cross browser experience, he spends half a page telling you to do something that ensures you WON'T get the same results and you will be wasting your time typing on top of it.

Any Author that writes a book on the subject should know what a screen and a browser can do.

A quick summary of some other shortcomings of the book are below:

- Only support for sites running on Apache. If you use Nginx or Node you won't like this book
- In several pages on the

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful.
3and flexbox is still bleeding edge with many features vendor dependent and even the markup has vendor imprints like -moz- or -we
By mark kortink
I have not finished working through yet and may lift my review rating. The reason I have given it a 3 is that it goes straight to flexbox and does not seem to cover grids except in passing. I was looking for a book that would teach me the prevalent way of doing responsive web design and that is grids, I wanted to understand them instead of just using a framework. This book uses flexbox not grids, and flexbox is still bleeding edge with many features vendor dependent and even the markup has vendor imprints like -moz- or -webkit-. Sorry but that is not what I signed up for.

0 of 0 people found the following review helpful.
5Great for an experienced person
By billfish
I'm a conceptual guy. I like explanation, not examples. This discusses and explains. The writer is not absolutely the clearest writer I've ever read, but he explains things in a way that is solid and sets them in my mind and is usable. I have found many other explanations to be vague or partial or confusing or to assume too much or too little. This is not for an inexperienced person. I'm not a programmer but am quite knowledgable about computer languages and web sites and HTML and CSS and am OK with Javascript, and this came in at exactly the right level for me. The programmer's humor is there but is kept to a level where it doesn't take over. I felt much more confident after reading this, and am using the new constructs.

See all 91 customer reviews...

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