A Web for Everyone: Designing Accessible User Experiences

A Web for Everyone: Designing Accessible User Experiences
By Sarah Horton, Whitney Quesenbery

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Product Description

If you are in charge of the user experience, development, or strategy for a web site, A Web for Everyone will help you make your site accessible without sacrificing design or innovation. Rooted in universal design principles, this book provides solutions: practical advice and examples of how to create sites that everyone can use.


Product Details

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #307890 in Books
  • Published on: 2014-01-16
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 288 pages

Editorial Reviews

Review
I've been waiting for this book the book that changes the discussion from "How do I meet accessibility requirements," to thinking of accessibility as a driver for innovation and excellent user experience design. --Dana Chisnell, co-author of Handbook of Usability Testing

Accessibility isn't just about providing a great experience for the disabled it's what will enable you to connect with all your users, regardless of which device they use to go online. --Karen McGrane, author of Content Strategy for Mobile

Do yourself a favor and read it. By the time you re done, you ll understand that accessibility isn t something you tack on to a good design—it is good design. --Steve Krug, author of Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability

Accessibility isn't just about providing a great experience for the disabled it's what will enable you to connect with all your users, regardless of which device they use to go online. --Karen McGrane, author of Content Strategy for Mobile

Do yourself a favor and read it. By the time you re done, you ll understand that accessibility isn t something you tack on to a good design—it is good design. --Steve Krug, author of Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability

Accessibility isn't just about providing a great experience for the disabled it's what will enable you to connect with all your users, regardless of which device they use to go online. --Karen McGrane, author of Content Strategy for Mobile

Do yourself a favor and read it. By the time you re done, you ll understand that accessibility isn t something you tack on to a good design—it is good design. --Steve Krug, author of Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability

About the Author
Sarah Horton is a consultant for strategic planning for websites and web applications. She also does accessibility and usability reviews. Sarah started her career in interaction design in 1991 at the Yale Center for Advanced Instructional Media, creating award-winning interactive instructional software. She was an instructional technologist at Dartmouth College for 11 years before becoming director of web strategy and design. As director, she was responsible for planning and developing Dartmouth's digital environment, and she led a team of user-experience professionals responsible for web and media design, development, and production. More recently, Sarah was Web Strategy Project Lead at Harvard University, responsible for strategy and user experience design for the Harvard Web Publishing Initiative. Sarah is currently Director of Accessible User Experience and Design with The Paciello Group. Sarah is co-author with Patrick Lynch of Web Style Guide, now in its third edition and translated into at least eight languages. She also wrote Web Teaching Guide, which in 2000 won the American Association of Publishers award for best book in computer science. Her third book, Access by Design, combines the disciplines of universal design, accessibility, and usability into guidelines for designing websites that are universally usable.

Whitney Quesenbery is a user researcher, user experience practitioner, and usability expert with a passion for clear communication. She has been in the field for too many years, working with organizations from The Open University to the National Cancer Institute. She enjoys learning about people around the world and using those insights to design products where people matter. Before a little beige computer seduced her into software, usability, and interface design, she was a lighting designer in the theater. Like every other element of the production, lighting has to help tell the story. The scenery, lighting, costumes, direction and acting all have to work together tell the same story. She learned a lot about the craft of storytelling from watching hours of rehearsals. Whitney has served as president of the Usability Professionals' Association (UPA), on the boards of the Center for Plain Language and UXnet, and as a manager of the Society for Technical Communication (STC) Usability and User Experience Community. As a member of two U.S. government advisory committees, she is working to update accessibility requirements and to improve the usability and accessibility of voting systems for U.S. elections. Whitney is a frequent author and presenter in industry events and is a contributor to UXmatters.com. Her first publication on storytelling was a book chapter on "Storytelling and Narrative" in The Personas Lifecycle, by John Pruitt and Tamara Adlin. She's also proud that her chapter "Dimensions of Usability" in Content and Complexity turns up on so many course reading lists. You can find Whitney on Twitter @whitneyq.


Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful.
5Great foundation for educating new and experienced Accessibility Specialists, UX Designers, and Web Developers
By My Opinion
This book is well organized and written in “plain language”. It’s a great read for both beginner and experienced accessibility, UX, and web development professionals.

The book takes a unique user-centered design approach to explaining web accessibility through a series of “personas” (characterizations explaining how users with different abilities approach using the web). Each chapter also includes a mapping of the chapter’s Accessible User Experience (UX) principles to the relevant WCAG 2.0 web accessibility principles (POUR) and requirements.

The personas and examples included in this book help to tell the story of why web accessibility is so important in the daily lives of many people. Moreover, the personas go beyond "traditional" examples of people with disabilities (e.g., a blind user using a screen reader to access a web page or a deaf user who requires closed captions for multimedia content). The “Lea” persona, for instance, breathes life into the “invisible” disability of fibromyalgia and explains how important keyboard accessibility is in reducing Lea’s fatigue in the workplace.

4 of 9 people found the following review helpful.
1Is this what you're looking for?
By Harry Mcintosh
If you're looking for nuts-and-bolts help with making your website more accessible to people with disabilities, you should look elsewhere. This book consists mostly of broad design information without the details you need to actually do the work.

In addition, the authors pontificate too much. They want you to follow their idea of good design, even at the expense of making your website less accessible to the non-disabled.

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful.
5At last: the book we need now on accessibility
By C. Jarrett
Some dozen years ago, I had a conversation with a web developer that went like this:

Him:"Our web site meets WCAG triple A"
Me:"But do you know whether people with disabilities can use it?"

Of course, he was right to be proud of his achievement. The WCAG guidelines, published by the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) of the W3C consortium, are "a single shared standard for web content accessibility". It's important to meet them.

But I was also right. The purpose of the guidelines, and of all accessibility initiatives, is to create things that people with disabilities can use. For example: my father. His sight is no longer good enough for him to be able to drive, so now grocery shopping happens online. He struggles to read anything on paper, but the web means he can continue his historical research.

Up to now, there were books and resources about making things work for people with disabilities, and there was WCAG. But there were lots of gaps between them.

Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery have magnificently filled those gaps with this book. I'm going to declare an interest: they shared an early draft with me. At that stage, their intention was clear and what I wanted. But I hope they won't mind if I reveal that the draft I saw was best described as a muddle. I cheered them on - but between you and me, I wondered if they'd manage to deliver.

Well, they certainly did. A remarkably short time later, I got back my copy. Wow! This was the book that I wanted them to write. It's clear, it's engaging, it's practical. It's about making things work for people with disabilities. And it explains how what we need to do relates to the WCAG standard.

Buy it, read it, use it.

See all 9 customer reviews...

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