Front-End Web Development: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (Big Nerd Ranch Guides)

Front-End Web Development: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (Big Nerd Ranch Guides)
By Chris Aquino, Todd Gandee

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Product Description

Front-end development targets the browser, putting your applications in front of the widest range of users regardless of device or operating system. This guide will give you a solid foundation for creating rich web experiences across platforms.

Focusing on JavaScript, CSS3, and HTML5, this book is for programmers with a background in other platforms and developers with previous web experience who need to get up to speed quickly on current tools and best practices.

Each chapter of this book will guide you through essential concepts and APIs as you build a series of applications. You will implement responsive UIs, access remote web services, build applications with Ember.js, and more. You will also debug and test your code with cutting-edge development tools and harness the power of Node.js and the wealth of open-source modules in the npm registry. After working through the step-by-step example projects, you will understand how to build modern websites and web applications.


Product Details

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #116974 in Books
  • Published on: 2016-08-08
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: 9.90" h x 1.30" w x 7.00" l, .0 pounds
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 478 pages

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Front-end development targets the browser, putting your applications in front of the widest range of users regardless of device or operating system. This guide will give you a solid foundation for creating rich web experiences across platforms.

Focusing on JavaScript, CSS3, and HTML5, this book is for programmers with a background in other platforms and developers with previous web experience who need to get up to speed quickly on current tools and best practices.

Each chapter of this book will guide you through essential concepts and APIs as you build a series of applications. You will implement responsive UIs, access remote web services, build applications with Ember.js, and more. You will also debug and test your code with cutting-edge development tools and harness the power of Node.js and the wealth of open-source modules in the npm registry. After working through the step-by-step example projects, you will understand how to build modern websites and web applications.

About the Author

Chris Aquino is the director of web engineering and an instructor at Big Nerd Ranch. As a developer, he hopes to provide users with meaningful experiences of data. In his current role, he is dedicated to helping his team and his students build a better web. Chris delights in wind-up toys, espresso, and all forms of barbecue.

Todd Gandee is a front-end engineer and instructor at Big Nerd Ranch. He has been honing his craft as a web consultant for more than 10 years. Todd enjoys running, biking, and rock climbing when he is not programming. 


Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful.
2promising topic + disappointing implementation = mixed feelings
By JM
Im working through this book now. I bought it based on the recommendation of a colleague.

A bit about me for contexts sake: I began coding in the 90s. I have moved through my career generally picking up whats hot because I would need it for something or other at work. (I think projects are the best way to make a language stick, which is one thing I liked about this book's product description.) I've been through ASP, Visual Basic, PHP, Drupal, and a wide assortment of database/ecommerce technologies. I also taught JavaScript at the college level for a while. I generally keep my eyes open and hop the rising tide as a technology agnostic. That all said, this time around I just didn't hop onto node when I could have. Woke up one day and noticed I was covered in dust (figuratively) Rip Van Winkle isn't a good look on me. So I decided to remedy this by digging into it for awhile. Hence this book.

One major issue I have with this book: Although it is supposed to have been written for people like me (have already written some code, need to get familiar with a more modern set) there is nothing mentioned about how to construct your progress. All it says is that if you pay for the $4,200 onsite bootcamp, it takes a week. And that you shouldn't expect to proceed that fast because you're not in the 4200 bootcamp, which Im sure is accurate. The book also mentions that you should read it in sequence, not skipping around. They offer a forum on the bignerd website, which seems full of nice folks but very dormant. I can understand why, because once I finish this book, I probably wont be wanting to make it a part of my life either. They recommend you use the Atom text editor. If you are on Windows, the install will make you want to claw your own eyes out. Dont do that though. You have such pretty eyes.

OK.

So you will spend the first 5 chapters (100 pages) learning skills that allow you to make a responsive HTML page. Thats fine, I guess. You get around another 100 pages to get CSS and then starting at page 200, you meet Bootstrap.

I dont have an issue with gong back to basics, because you can complete the exercises quickly as a review. But it seems very odd to me that the book says it is targeted toward people who already know how to program using tenets of CS logic, yet would take so long on something like HTML/basic CSS. In chapter 10 you do get to JavaScript. (approx 225 pages into the 468-page book) This leads to traversing the DOM, forms validation and Ajax

In Chapter 13, you get into nodejs, the darling of bootcamps everywhere.(page 295). Then a section on WebSockets, which id say is also pretty on-trend. No snark here, on-trend is where I want to be. ES6 is pages 325 - 365

The final section of the book is titled Application Architecture. You will get MVC and Ember in Chapter 19. then its routes, models, databinding etc. Views and Templates make an appearance in Chapter 23 (page 422 of the 468-pagecount)

The exercises throughout the book are organized in silver, bronze and gold categories (ascending levels of difficulty) . There are 4 projects
Project 1 - Ottergram. photo gallery
Project 2 - CoffeeRun. order form/checklist
Project 3 - Chattrbox. nodeJs chatsystem. (For the love of god, please dont attempt to use this as a portfolio piece)
Project 4 - Tracker. an online categorizer/logging system
Oddly, the full descriptions of each project appear only once, buried in page xvi of the foreword. So when you encounter them in place, there are only very cursory reference to what the project youre building actually does. ex: "In this chapter, you will design a static version of Ottergram. In the chapters that follow you will make Ottergram interactive" What the heck is Ottergram? I didnt remember, but will take it on faith. Again, I can live with this, but it feels like an odd editorial choice.

My strongest criticism of this book is that I see nothing in the contents list or back index about testing and very little on debugging. How this could have been left out is really beyond me. Perhaps its in a chapter I havent got to? But if that is so, I still would ask why.

I would have very much appreciated if the book contained some kind of information on the relative effort contained in the overall experience. the gold/silver thing is alright. But frankly if the audience is supposed to already understand basic tenets of computer science then I cant see how splashing around static html in the the first half of the book bears any kind of symmetrical effort to the back half.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful.
3Lack of context and needed clarification limits utility
By schwarzwald
What's the point of throwing out random chunks of CSS if you aren't going to explain what they mean or why that's being done?

This is a helpful starting point, but all it does is lead me into reference docs and other resources.

Chapter 4 is the opposite of how to teach CSS.

0 of 0 people found the following review helpful.
5Love the writing style and the clear examples in this ...
By Amazon Customer
Love the writing style and the clear examples in this book. The code actually works! So many development books I buy are riddled with typos, yet this book is almost typo-free. What a refreshing change! Love the Big Nerd Ranch series.

See all 23 customer reviews...

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